Movies: 1123
Comments: 67721
Members: 719
Online: 0 Guests: 29
  • warning: Attempt to modify property of non-object in /home/corona/public_html/modules/date/includes/date_plugin_display_attachment.inc on line 24.
  • warning: Attempt to modify property of non-object in /home/corona/public_html/modules/date/includes/date_plugin_display_attachment.inc on line 25.
  • warning: Attempt to modify property of non-object in /home/corona/public_html/modules/date/includes/date_plugin_display_attachment.inc on line 26.
  • warning: Attempt to modify property of non-object in /home/corona/public_html/modules/date/includes/date_plugin_display_attachment.inc on line 28.
  • warning: Attempt to modify property of non-object in /home/corona/public_html/modules/date/includes/date_plugin_display_attachment.inc on line 29.
  • warning: Attempt to modify property of non-object in /home/corona/public_html/modules/date/includes/date_plugin_display_attachment.inc on line 30.
  • warning: Attempt to modify property of non-object in /home/corona/public_html/modules/date/includes/date_plugin_display_attachment.inc on line 31.
film news

The Rat brings about the return of Youngblood

Posted by Patrick Sauriol on Sunday, February 8, 2009

In a move that may show how completely out-of-touch Brett Ratner is with what's considered cool in the world of comic books, the X-Men: The Last Stand director is attached to make a movie out of Rob Liefeld's critically panned but bestselling comic book series from the 1990s, Youngblood.

The cinematic rights to Liefeld's Youngblood were bought by Indian development company Reliance Big Entertainment for -- and I can't believe this figure but Variety is reporting it -- the mid-six figures. That's a lot of money to pay for a comic book that doesn't have that big a following.

"Most of the great graphic novels are gone, and Youngblood is one of the few comicbooks left with tentpole potential," Ratner told the publication, seemingly completely unaware that the original Youngblood was one of the most reviled comics of its time. "It was a real personal passion project for me, and a lot of people wanted (Youngblood), but the amazing thing about the guys at Reliance is the speed with which they’re able to move."

Youngblood centers on a group of superpowered costumed heroes who are endorsed by the United States government and serve as an official strike force for America. Since the publication of its first issue in 1992 there have been four different Youngblood series, with the latest incarnation beginning last year and currently up to its eighth issue. Liefeld brought the title back to its original home at Image Comics last year and in the latest issue out this month has a story that he both illustrated and penned. Nevertheless, Liefeld is still attracting controversy amongst the fanbase: for an example, read this thread on Newsarama and see what people are saying. Don't say that I didn't warn you.

-variety.
The Swollen Goi...
Location:
Posts: 14343
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

Ha ha!

The Swollen Goi...
Location:
Posts: 14343
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

Also:

Most of the great graphic novels are gone....

No.

Youngblood is one of the few comic books left with tentpole potential....

No.

It was a real personal passion project for me....

This . . . I believe.

[A] lot of people wanted [Youngblood]....

Maybe he means the Rob Lowe movie. Maybe he means Carl Wilson's swansong. Maybe he's mistaking Liefeld's Youngblood with the FlowerFolk band The Youngbloods. He must mean one of these--unlikely as it is that *a lot* of people feel a want for any one of these--simply because he cannot mean Liefeld's Youngblood.

The Swollen Goi...
Location:
Posts: 14343
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

What constitutes a graphic novel these days, anyway? Must it have been published for the first time as a collection of greater than standard length? Can it be a mini- or maxi-series collecting a story arc? I'm guessing the latter must be the case, since we all seem to talk about Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns as if they were never released an issue at a time. I am cool with this. Some novels were serialized before being published as novels, after all. Du Maurier's Trilby is a good example. There are countless others, of course.

If we consider any collected story arc to be a potential graphic novel, then, there's plenty great graphic novels left unadapted (whether or not their rights have been bought up is another story). Even if we consider the story arcs for properties that already have movies based on them--though not on the arcs in question--there are still plenty of well-regarded "graphic novels" to go around. So discounting things like Iron Man's Demon in a Bottle arc, or alternate reality takes such as Days of Future Past or Kingdom Come, there's:

Bone
Blankets
Clumsy
Maus
Jimmy Corrigan
A Contract with God
Walking Dead
Cerebus
Zot!

Any Number of ElfQuest, Sandman, or Concrete arcs

Even if he just means "superhero" books, there's still the original Squadron Supreme, Top 10, and Astro City. Among others.

The Swollen Goi...
Location:
Posts: 14343
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

Yes, I realize we're dealin' with the Rat, here, and that there's no reason to weigh a word he says against anything heavier than the tip of a single barb from the feather of a hummingbird.

But still!

mckracken
Location:
Posts: 965
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

1) hey...at least its not Uwe Boll
2) so the Rat paid six figures for this? six figures of WHAT? LOL! (oh wait he wasnt talking about those six YoungBlood action figures?)

and yes look on the bright side... finally Batman & Robin might actually be knocked off its pedestal for worst superhero movie ever.

The Swollen Goi...
Location:
Posts: 14343
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

If you'd like to see Liefeld's genius in a compacter form, there's always Shrink.

Better make sure you have a new ass on standby; Shrink is going to destroy your old one.

Baelzar
Location:
Posts: 213
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

Ha. Liefeld is SUCKTASTIC!

"INDEED!"
mckracken
Location:
Posts: 965
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

Baelzar... uh... so is Ratner.

Col_Matrix
Location:
Posts: 313
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

When I was a kid Leifeld had a great rep...whaaa happened?

"You think we can smell them coming?"
The Swollen Goi...
Location:
Posts: 14343
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

All the nine-to-twelve-year-old kids who liked Liefeld grew up, and in growing up began to realize that anatomical incorrectness, absence of backgrounds, lack of plot beyond "break into base," shoulder pads, pouches, laughably giant guns, and panel-after-panel of samey, un-dynamic "jump" poses and hunch-backed, closed-fist leaning.

Then they reconsidered the art of Art Adams and Walt Simonson, the guys chiefly responsible for the laughably bad artwork of Liefeld and McFarlane, and saw that those two at least had some substance to their style, and though their work was cartoony, it was at least consistent and competent.

That's what happened.

McFarlane realized some time ago he was better off paying an arguably decent artist (though one forced to slum by mere association with Spawn; you do what you have to do to pay the bills, I guess [I am talking about Capullo, here]) to ape his style. Realized. Fucker must have Alzheimer's or something, because he's drawing again. Why, Todd?

mckracken
Location:
Posts: 965
Posted: 5 years 37 weeks ago

I miss Sam Keith's The Maxxx.

Col_Matrix
Location:
Posts: 313
Posted: 5 years 36 weeks ago

I kinda stopped after my cousin bought my collection from me circa '94. I had a pretty sizable library of around 500, but more than half of those were given to me. I appreciate your post TSG because I've been out of the loop. I can totally see why they dropped off. They were cool at the time though, weren't they? Who didn't love Spawn, and...hmmm, having a hard time remembering the others. There was one with a giant Lizard-man by Image that was popular. Wetworks was another. That was Liefeld right?

"You think we can smell them coming?"
The Swollen Goi...
Location:
Posts: 14343
Posted: 5 years 36 weeks ago

Wetworks was Whilce Portacio and Brandon Choi.

I think the "giant Lizard-man" to which you refer is Erik Larsen's Savage Dragon. He's still doing it, and it was always one of the better ones (at least among the original lineup). I always liked Larsen because his work reminded me of some kind of John Byrne/Walt Simonson hybrid, and because his name reminded me of Eric Larson--one of Disney's Nine Old Men. Dumb reasons to like him, maybe, but those were the reasons.