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Sunday, May 29, 2011

Review: Game of Thrones, Episode 6

Weighing in at just over 800 pages, A Game of Thrones is full of plots and sub-plots, primary and secondary (and tertiary and ancillary) characters, major and minor leitmotifs, and foreshadowing of foreshadowing – to say it is a dense narrative is an understatement in the extreme, particularly considering its status as only the inaugural chapter of a much larger tale.  This column (It Is Known: An Analysis of Thrones) will act as a companion piece to both series, novel and television, analyzing each installment’s character beats and plot points as well as scrutinizing the transition from page to script.  What it will not do is spoil the story; the hope and intent is elucidation, not ruination.

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Thursday, May 19, 2011

Review: Game of Thrones, Episode 5

Weighing in at just over 800 pages, A Game of Thrones is full of plots and sub-plots, primary and secondary (and tertiary and ancillary) characters, major and minor leitmotifs, and foreshadowing of foreshadowing – to say it is a dense narrative is an understatement in the extreme, particularly considering its status as only the inaugural chapter of a much larger tale.  This column (It Is Known: An Analysis of Thrones) will act as a companion piece to both series, novel and television, analyzing each installment’s character beats and plot points as well as scrutinizing the transition from page to script.  What it will not do is spoil the story; the hope and intent is elucidation, not ruination.

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Sunday, May 15, 2011

Review: Game of Thrones, Episode 4

Weighing in at just over 800 pages, A Game of Thrones is full of plots and sub-plots, primary and secondary (and tertiary and ancillary) characters, major and minor leitmotifs, and foreshadowing of foreshadowing – to say it is a dense narrative is an understatement in the extreme, particularly considering its status as only the inaugural chapter of a much larger tale.  This column (It Is Known: An Analysis of Thrones) will act as a companion piece to both series, novel and television, analyzing each installment’s character beats and plot points as well as scrutinizing the transition from page to script.  What it will not do is spoil the story; the hope and intent is elucidation, not ruination.

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Thursday, May 12, 2011

Review: Bridesmaids

Finally, a chick flick that is as crude as a guy's movie. Bridesmaids is a great way to follow up the start of the summer movie season, with the macho testosterone adventure of Fast Five and Thor breaking the ground first. It's another feather in the cap of producer Judd Apatow, a career boost for directir Paul Feig and an opportunity for several actresses to breakthrough into bigger opportunities. And for the lead actress and co-writer Kristen Wiig, it's her opportunity to show that she doesn't have to march into former SNL cast member obscurity. She's got the talent and the understanding of how big screen comedy works to ensure that she be given another lead role or two to cement her place as Hollywood's best go-to comedic movie actress.

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Sunday, May 8, 2011

Review: Game of Thrones, Episode 3

Weighing in at just over 800 pages, A Game of Thrones is full of plots and sub-plots, primary and secondary (and tertiary and ancillary) characters, major and minor leitmotifs, and foreshadowing of foreshadowing – to say it is a dense narrative is an understatement in the extreme, particularly considering its status as only the inaugural chapter of a much larger tale. This column (It Is Known: An Analysis of Thrones) will act as a companion piece to both series, novel and television, analyzing each installment’s character beats and plot points as well as scrutinizing the transition from page to script. What it will not do is spoil the story; the hope and intent is elucidation, not ruination.

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Friday, May 6, 2011

Thursty's Stinky 2-D Thor Review

A Word of Warning:

What follows is a review of 2-D Thor's taco-popping 2-D visuals. For an in-depth, Corona-like look at the 3-D Thor, go here.

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Thursday, May 5, 2011

Review: Thor

Some great acting and a powerful climax isn’t enough to overcome the genial pacing and lack of conflict that turn much of Thor into a fairly bland summer film.

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Sunday, May 1, 2011

Review: Game of Thrones, Episode 2

 

Weighing in at just over 800 pages, A Game of Thrones is full of plots and sub-plots, primary and secondary (and tertiary and ancillary) characters, major and minor leitmotifs, and foreshadowing of foreshadowing – to say it is a dense narrative is an understatement in the extreme, particularly considering its status as only the inaugural chapter of a much larger tale.  This column (It Is Known: An Analysis of Thrones) will act as a companion piece to both series, novel and television, analyzing each installment’s character beats and plot points as well as scrutinizing the transition from page to script.  What it will not do is spoil the story; the hope and intent is elucidation, not ruination.

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Sunday, April 24, 2011

Review: Game of Thrones, Episode 1

Weighing in at just over 800 pages, A Game of Thrones is full of plots and sub-plots, primary and secondary (and tertiary and ancillary) characters, major and minor leitmotifs, and foreshadowing of foreshadowing – to say it is a dense narrative is an understatement in the extreme, particularly considering its status as only the inaugural chapter of a much larger tale.  This column (It Is Known: An Analysis of Thrones) will act as a companion piece to both series, novel and television, analyzing each installment’s character beats and plot points as well as scrutinizing the transition from page to script.  What it will not do is spoil the story; the hope and intent is elucidation, not ruination.

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Tuesday, March 29, 2011

DVD Review: Tangled

I'll have to admit that I was pleasantly surprised by Tangled. My impressions of the film, based solely on the marketing and hype leading up to its November 2010 release, were that it wasn't something that I was going to be interested in watching.

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Thursday, March 24, 2011

Review: Sucker Punch

There is a common and incorrect perception held by the general public that video games cannot tell great stories. Jaw-dropping visuals, yes, and lots of action, sure. But a story that takes the player deeper into the world? Many people that don't play video games think that these stories can't reach great heights because they're too focused on the visuals or the action. In response I point to Silent Hill 2, Deux Ex, I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream, the Ultima series, the Infocom word games from the early days of computer gaming, and I say to those doubters that they are wrong. There are games that push the art form to a truly interactive, creative level.

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Monday, March 7, 2011

DVD Review: Bambi - Diamond Edition

I'll have to come clean and admit something: as a child I never watched Bambi. My head and heart were captured by outer space and Star Wars, and the cartoons I grew up watching were old Looney Tunes and Woody Woodpecker shows. Instead of crying over that most infamous of moments in Bambi (and if you don't know what I'm talking about, then I won't be the one to spoil you now), I cried over Bruce Dern blowing up the Valley Forge at the end of Silent Running.

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Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Review: The Adjustment Bureau

In The Adjustment Bureau, clean shaven and square-jawed Matt Damon plays David Norris, a U.S. politician who finds that his free will isn't quite as free as he believed. After chance brings him across the beautiful dancer Elise Sellas (Emily Blunt, doing her best American accent that she can pull off), he finds himself falling hard for her, as if he waited his entire life to meet this one woman. Elise feels the same way he does, and after another chance encounter on a bus, they seem destined to have a whirlwind romance and live happily ever after.

But beware the men in fedoras and the strange unearthly powers they possess, for they have the power to alter David and Elise's lives and make certain that the two would-be lovers never find each other again.

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Review: 150 Movies You Should Die Before You See

If you've spent any considerable length of time watching film then you know there are bad movies -- and then there are the really bad ones. You can identify these stinkers because there's something just not quite right about them. Sometimes it's their budget (or lack of one). On other occasions money wasn't the problem; it was the acting, or the writing, or the special effects, or the over-the-top concept. Sometimes it's several of these reasons, and on really spectacular occasions, when the stars and moon are in alignment, it could be all of these things.

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Thursday, February 3, 2011

Review: Sanctum

On paper it sounds like a winning formula: your movie's story is about a group of adventurers get trapped in a flooding underground cave system and have to hope there is another way out by pushing on into the unexplored regions that lie ahead. The movie will be shot using the best 3D cameras so you won't be getting a crummy post-3D look to it and, get this, the guy who made the best 3D movie ever has agreed to be an executive producer on the film. Sounds like you can't go wrong, right?

Sanctum is what happens when it goes wrong.

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